Find out more about how to maintain your physical, emotional and personal wellbeing.

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Wellbeing

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Mindful Activities Week4

This week their is a Guinness world record task

Coronavirus; supporting children’s wellbeing

Wellbeing tips for families:
• Talk to your children, and answer their questions. Ask about what they have heard about the virus and the situation so that you can correct possible misconceptions and reassure them.
• Avoid being too immersed in media coverage. Be mindful of the amount of things you are reading and watching, including social media – as this may add to worry and anxiety. Consider a few updates every day from trusted sources.
• Remember that people react differently to significant events. Some people – adults and children – may feel worried, some excited, some nothing much at all. Be reassured that different reactions are normal and ok.
• If your child seems worried, it may be good to distract themselves with something that takes their mind off their worries. You might also want to set aside 10-15 minutes each day for them to talk about any worries, and to reassure them.
• Remember to keep things positive and give children hope. For example, tell children that now many people are working to make this better and that even though it is serious, everyone is doing their best to help people.
• Do nice things together, and keep active. Make a plan and suggest some regular family times where you can play games, do some exercise together, or do other things that you know most of you like. Try to find a good balance between time together, and screen time.
• Try to keep familiar routines. Well-known routines in everyday life provide security and stability.
• Keep in good contact with family and friends (via Facetime, Skype WhatsApp etc.; following nhs guidance on ‘social contact’). This will help children connect with others and know that others are thinking about them. It will also reassure them that others are well.
• As a parent you may be concerned yourself. Take care of yourself and make sure you have breaks, time to relax, and ask for help from others if you need.
• Try to keep familiar routines. Well-known routines in everyday life provide security and stability.
• Do nice things together, and keep active. Make a plan and suggest some regular family times where you can play games, do some exercise together, or do other things that you know most of you like. Try to find a good balance between time together, and screen time.
• Keep in good contact with family and friends (via Facetime, Skype WhatsApp etc.; following nhs guidance on ‘social contact’). This will help children connect with others and know that others are thinking about them. It will also reassure them that others are well.
• As a parent you may be concerned yourself. Take care of yourself and make sure you have breaks, time to relax, and ask for help from others if you need.

World Health Organization (WHO)

World Health Organization (WHO)
545K subscribers
What do you know about the novel Coronavirus that is causing a health emergency? Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans. Watch this short video to find out more.

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some more resources available online

Can’t Talk, Write: helping young people to express how they feel

We’ve teamed up with Royal Mail and The Prince’s Trust to launch our Can’t Talk, Write toolkits. These downloadable work books are full of activities to get young people writing.